Events

Check Back Frequently as New Exhibits and Programs Are Added Throughout 2020!

February 1-February 29, 2020: The House That Rube Built: The Negro Leagues Centennial (Exhibition):  The Institute for Baseball Studies and the Baseball Reliquary present an exhibition of artworks, artifacts, and photographs to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the founding of the first successful, organized black professional baseball league – the Negro National League, founded by Andrew “Rube” Foster in Kansas City, Missouri on February 13, 1920. Also included in the exhibition are player profiles created by Whittier College students enrolled in Joe Price’s JanTerm 2020 course, “The Negro Leagues and American Culture.” Wardman Library Lobby, Whittier College, 7031 Founders Hill Road, Whittier, California. Library hours are Monday-Thursday, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 midnight; Friday, 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.; Saturday, 10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.; Sunday, 12:00 noon-12:00 midnight. Further information, phone (562) 907-4247.

February 1-February 29, 2020: Then Came Rube: The Negro Leagues Centennial (Exhibition):  The Baseball Reliquary and the Institute for Baseball Studies present an exhibition of artworks, artifacts, and photographs to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the founding of the first successful, organized black professional baseball league – the Negro National League, founded by Andrew “Rube” Foster in Kansas City, Missouri on February 13, 1920. La Pintoresca Branch Library, 1355 N. Raymond Ave., Pasadena, California. Library hours are Monday-Saturday, 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.; closed Sunday. Further information, phone (626) 744-7268.

Saturday, February 22, 2020, 2:00 p.m.: Negro Leagues Centennial Presentation by Phil S. Dixon (Discussion & Book Signing): The Baseball Reliquary and Institute for Baseball Studies host a discussion by author and historian Phil S. Dixon, based on his book The Dizzy and Daffy Dean Barnstorming Tour: Race, Media, and America’s National Pastime. Dixon examines the social implications of the 1934 barnstorming tour of pitchers Dizzy and Daffy Dean, in which they competed against the Kansas City Monarchs and other Negro League teams, and specifically how the media’s biased coverage of the tour downplayed the contributions of Negro League players such as Satchel Paige, Chet Brewer, Josh Gibson, and James “Cool Papa” Bell, and perpetuated racism in American sports. Dixon will sign his book The Dizzy and Daffy Dean Barnstorming Tour: Race, Media, and America’s National Pastime, copies of which will be available for sale. Light refreshments will be served. Free admission. La Pintoresca Branch Library, 1355 N. Raymond Ave., Pasadena, California. Further information, phone (626) 791-7647.

Monday, February 24, 2020, 7:00 p.m.: Negro Leagues Centennial Presentation by Phil S. Dixon (Discussion & Book Signing): The Baseball Reliquary and Institute for Baseball Studies host a discussion by author and historian Phil S. Dixon, based on his book Wilber “Bullet” Rogan and the Kansas City Monarchs. Dixon revisits the career of Hall-of-Famer Wilber “Bullet” Rogan, considered by some to be baseball’s greatest all-around player, and the history of the legendary Kansas City Monarchs teams from 1920-1938. During Rogan’s career, the Monarchs won five pennants, two Negro League World Series, and featured such talents as Satchel Paige, Chet Brewer, Andy Cooper, and Newt Allen. Dixon will also talk about the many barnstorming trips that Rogan made with his Kansas City teammates and other Negro League greats, including playing winter league baseball in Los Angeles. Dixon will sign his book Wilber “Bullet” Rogan and the Kansas City Monarchs, copies of which will be available for sale. Free admission. Wardman Library, Whittier College, 7031 Founders Hill Road, Whittier, California. Further information, phone (626) 791-7647.

Saturday, April 25, 2020, 2:00 p.m.: Stealing Home: Los Angeles, the Dodgers, and the Lives Caught in Between (Discussion & Book Signing with Eric Nusbaum): The Baseball Reliquary and the Allendale Branch Library host a discussion with Eric Nusbaum, author of Stealing Home: Los Angeles, the Dodgers, and the Lives Caught in Between. The book chronicles the contentious battle between the City of Los Angeles and the residents of Chavez Ravine, who were evicted from their homes in the early 1950s to make way for a public housing project that never happened due to a Red Scare conspiracy. The city eventually sold the land to Walter O’Malley, which allowed for the construction of Dodger Stadium. But before Dodger Stadium could be built, the city would have to face down the neighborhood’s families — including one, the Aréchigas, who refused to yield their home. The ensuing confrontation captivated the nation – and the divisive outcome still echoes through Los Angeles today. Eric Nusbaum will sign copies of Stealing Home, and there will be a display of photographs and materials related to the events described in the book. Light refreshments will be served. Free admission. Allendale Branch Library, 1130 S. Marengo Ave., Pasadena, California. Further information, phone (626) 791-7647.

ONGOING EVENTS:

The Baseball Reliquary presents a display of Negro Leagues memorabilia, and Jackie Robinson artworks and artifacts, including Michael Guccione’s “Jackie Robinson Icon” and William Robert Steele’s replica of Ebbets Field.  Jackie Robinson Community Center, 1020 N. Fair Oaks Ave., Pasadena, California. Hours are Monday-Thursday, 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.; Friday, 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.; closed Saturday and Sunday.  For further information, phone (626) 744-7300.

 

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